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NUR131: Research Foundations for Health Practice: Task 3 - Poster Presentation

Getting started with Task 3

Before you start researching, make sure you understand what your assessment is about.

Visit the Assignment Calculator and work out a time frame for Task 3.

This excellent evidence based practice tutorial developed by PubMed reviews EBP concepts and include PICO formulation practice exercises.

This tutorial was created by PubMed to help clinicians including nurses and allied health professionals develop a clinical question using the PICO framework and efficiently find relevant biomedical literature using PubMed. The tutorial was designed to be completed in less than 30 minutes. 

Resources for this task

Use these Image libraries to find freely available images. Check the licensing for each image to make sure you are able to use this within copyright.

  • A helpful tip! :How do I find an original image to reference it?

  • Try a reverse image search such as the one provided by Google
    • If you use Chrome as your web browser, it's as simple as right-clicking an image and selecting the 'Search Google for this image' option in the drop-down menu
    • If you don't use Chrome, follow these instructions provided by Google

From research topic to search strategy

These 3 minute videos from Bodleian Library review PICO and demonstrate how to turn those PICO elements from a research question into search terms.

Prefer print to video? Check the links below.

Need something more in-depth?

These excellent evidence based practice tutorials review EBP concepts and include PICO formulation practice exercises.

Great multi-module interactive tutorial from Duke University Medical Center Library

An interactive tutorial from the National Library of Medicine

How to find specific research

Instead of searching Library Search, use databases like:

Words like 'methods', 'study' and 'results' will be included in the abstract of a primary/original research article. Use these words in one of your search boxes 'methods OR study OR results' and set the search parameters for this specific search box to Abstract.

  • Open CINAHL Complete (EBSCO) and go the the Advanced Search.

  • Enter your keyword into the first search box (searching in Select a Field optional)
  • Enter 'methods OR study OR results' in the other search box (searching in AB Abstract)

Example from CINAHL Complete (EBSCO):

Another option CINAHL offers is a Research tick box in the Search Options (Limit your results). This could be used instead of the above.

And you can also select Research from the drop down menu in the 'Publication Type' filter option (also in your Search Options).

PubMed is a database of peer-reviewed biomedical literature. By searching PubMed, you will be searching Medline, plus additional recent content. PubMed search is freely available online, however to connect to full text articles from the University of the Sunshine Coast Library, use the link above. 

  • Open PubMed and go the the Advanced Search.
  • Enter your keyword into the first search box (searching in Select a Field optional) - click 'Add', you will see that your first keyword has moved to the 'Query' box
  • Select Title/Abstract from the drop-down menu under 'Add terms to the query box', enter 'methods OR study OR results' in the search box - click 'AND' - you will see that your two searches have been combined and appear in the 'Query' box
  • Select 'Search'

  • Secondary research articles are often called 'review' articles
  • The author(s) might make statements like "Previous studies found ..." or "We reviewed the literature ..." - the information comes from others' accounts
  • Secondary research describes, discusses, interprets, comments upon, analyzes, evaluates, summarizes and processes primary research
  • Abstract or summary will discuss the total number of studies that were examined and the criteria for inclusion of the studies in the review
  • Systematic Review is a report that collects and examines a number of related original research studies

Where to find secondary research

Use Library Search or specific databases to find books and journal articles.

Articles in many of these databases provide an analysis of data and historical events. Many provide the secondary sources that will help you broaden your topic and add credibility to your research.

The Australian Bureau of Statistics offers a good comparison of quantitative and qualitative data.

How to find Qualitative Research

Databases like CINAHL use specific subject terms.

CINAHL uses 'Qualitative Studies' as the subject term for qualitative research.

Let's do a search for Qualitative Research articles on Headaches:

  • Open CINAHL Complete (EBSCO) and go to Advanced Search
  • Enter your key words:
    • For 'qualitative studies' limit your search to 'MH Exact Subject Heading'.
    • For 'headache' leave your search set to 'Select a Field (optional)'

In CINAHL you can limit your search to 'Clinical Queries'. Within 'Clinical Queries' you can select Qualitative-High Sensitivity, Qualitative-High Specificity or Qualitative-Best Balance. High Sensitivity is the broadest search, to include ALL relevant material, but may also include less relevant materials. High Specificity is the most targeted search to include only the most relevant result set, but may miss some relevant materials. Best Balance retrieves the best balance between Sensitivity and Specificity.

Free text keywords

Use selective free text keywords to search in Titles, Abstracts or Keywords of records held in the databases to identify Qualitative Research. Selective keywords include terms like phenomenological, "lived experience", "grounded theory", "life experiences", "focus groups" or interview.

The Australian Bureau of Statistics offers a good comparison of quantitative and qualitative data.

How to find Quantitative Research

Databases like CINAHL use specific subject terms.

CINAHL uses 'Quantitative Studies' as the subject term for quantitative research.

Let's do a search for Quantitative Research articles on Diabetes:

  • Open CINAHL Complete (EBSCO) and go to Advanced Search
  • Enter your key words:
    • For 'quantitative studies' limit your search to 'MH Exact Subject Heading'.
    • For 'diabetes' leave your search set to 'Select a Field (optional)'

In CINAHL you could also use limiters like 'Research' and 'Statistics' under 'Publication Type' (multiple options can be highlighted by holding Ctrl while selecting options), or use the tick box for 'Research Articles'. For more information see Primary/Original Research.

Free text keywords

Use selective free text keywords to search in Titles, Abstracts or Keywords of records held in the databases to identify Quantitative Research. Selective keywords include quantitative, survey, validity, variance, correlation and statistical.

Key databases for Evidence Based Research

Clinical search engine which includes a PICO search interface and evidence mapping tool. Filters include systematic reviews and practice guidelines by country.

See also our Evidence-Based Practice list of resources.

Cochrane Library offers a collection of six databases that contain different types of high-quality, independent evidence to inform healthcare decision-making, including a database of systematic reviews. The database of systematic reviews and protocols can be searched, or browsed by topic or review group.

If you do a general search in Cochrane Library, you have the option to limit your search results to a specific database, like the reviews, trials, etc. Only the reviews and protocols provide full text access of the original article.

 

Joanna Briggs Institute JBI EBP Database (Ovid) provides you with easy access to evidence-based resources, making it easy for you to find and use evidence to inform your clinical decision-making. You can either search with keywords or you can browse your specialty area (see Nodes). If you don't limit your search by a specific type of publication, you can still select the publication from your search results

When searching PubMed you have the option to limit your search results by Article Types, incl. clinical trial, systematic review, case report, comparative study, randomized controlled trial, etc. Run a search and then refine by 'Article Type'. If more options are needed, select 'Additional filters' in the refinement options. 

Or you can select Clinical Queries (Pub Med homepage, below 'Find') from the PubMed homepage, which will limit your search from the start to Clinical Study Categories (incl. options to further limit results), Systematic Reviews and Medical Genetics (incl. the option to further limit results):

 

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